Emerald is changing… and we like what we see!

Emerald is moving to a new interface on the 30th June, which we think will provide an even better experience for our students and staff.

 

New features include:

  • Clean and uncluttered interface, with new fonts and colours that make it easier to use.
  • Persistent search box at the top of the screen (even when you move to different screens).
  • Easy to sort results by relevance, date and title
  • Type of content (article, case study) clearly displayed at the top of each record so you can quickly scan your results to locate the content you need.
  • Filters on the right menu bar to easily sort your results.
  • Less information on the results screen.  We like the summary and detail button which you can click when more info is needed.
  • Your terms highlighted in the results list

 

 

 

From the results screen you can easily find:

  • Bibliographic detail of the journal article, citation and keyword links
  • Useful content map of article to aid scan-reading.  This also helps students understand how a scholarly article is structured.

 

Your Emerald

If you already have set up alerts or other personalised features, don’t worry – these will be migrated over to the new interface.

If you are on campus, you can see the new site here: https://beta.emerald.com/insight

We’d be really interested to know what you think!

Westlaw is changing how it will look in July.

One of our key legal databases is having a face-lift, and in this case we like what we see!

New Westlaw

There are some good things for students:

  • Greater promotion of Topic pages (the new version of Insight) as the way to start a search for content
  • More current awareness features (‘commercial awareness’)
  • Easier to find help on search terms and connectors
  • Easier to set up folders and alerts, and save favourites
  • Cases are marked ‘Significant’ and also if they include legal or procedural ‘Guidance’
Topic page in Westlaw

There are some new good things for staff

  • Easier to create links to cases / legislation / journal articles to put into Moodle courses
  • Easier to create alerts via Insight pages on topics, so you are emailed when there are new cases or journal articles on your topic.

If you want to know more, there’s a good introductory video here: https://youtu.be/BhGXg7gkK8k

We’ve added the Westlaw – New Platform link to the A-Z list of databases so students and staff can preview it, and will fully swap over from the old Westlaw in July.

Let us know your thoughts!

 

Independent Living in the Library

In November the library launched its special collection to support our Independent Living and Skills for Employment students.

For the past 3 years the Library has been situated next to their classrooms but most students never thought of borrowing anything – and some thought they were not even allowed to.  Realising this was quite disheartening, so we have been trying to make the library more inclusive to students from this area for a few years.

Students didn’t think there were any resources for them, so Julia Sherrington (our Academic Liaison Librarian) has been conducting introductions to the library with tours, talks and showing them how to borrow items.

We show students which books and subjects might be interesting to them, and any that relate to what they study in the classroom, e.g. health, nutrition, cooking and gardening.  We showed the journals in the library and asked what magazines they would like to see.  As result of this we ordered a few magazines such as BBC Easy Cook.

Following observations from tutors in this area, they felt that having a separate section for their students would help as being in the library might be stressful.  We have had to move shelving and study spaces around quite a bit during the past few years so not all subject areas remain the same so this can cause confusion.

It was decided that having a few shelves of stock against the wall near to their classrooms would be a good idea. Having their own collection would also create a sense of ownership. Placing this collection between the Reading Collection and Graded Readers would mean that students could venture a little further and look at these other collections to help improve their comprehension.  As with the rest of our collections, this area isn’t exclusive to Independent Living/Skills for Employment students, anyone is welcome to borrow from it; just as these students are welcome to borrow anything in the Library.

In order to differentiate their books and DVDs from other areas we coded them with “IL” in front of their shelf-mark, this appears on the spine of the item and on the Library Management System. “IL” of course standing for “Independent Living”. Some of the stock was transferred from the main collection and some DVDs have been donated by the dept.  In addition to that, we have been ordering new stock.  One difficulty is in finding appropriate level books for adults with learning difficulties.  Many books for are for children rather than adults, so in some cases we have had to order some material aimed at children, but we are trying to avoid that whenever possible.

Labeling on Independent Living collection books

We have had some recent comments about students now asking their parents or carers to take them to their public library.  This is wonderful as it shows that this is adding to their independent skills and interest.  The library has suffered quite a bit of disruption with stock moves and the lighting in this area is quite low.  We have asked our Estates to increase lighting to make the area less “gloomy” and more navigable.  We will monitor how well this collection is used in the next year to see whether it is still useful and whether it is on the right location.  So, watch this space – quite literally!

Library Research finds that the quality and quantity of research sources appears to impact on dissertation marks.

The quality and quantity of research sources appears to impact on dissertation marks.

Julia Sherrington, Academic Liaison Librarian for Art, recently undertook some investigations into the types of sources being used in dissertations within the School of Arts.  She looked at the bibliographies in 43 dissertations from the 2017/18 cohort and mapped them against their dissertation mark.

What it showed was that students, gaining a mark of 60 and above, evidenced the use of more sources on average.

 

The range of sources mostly included books, journal articles, websites, research papers, and video.

The quality of sources also showed a correlation between marks.  The average use of scholarly books and journals was higher with those gaining higher marks.  A total of 273 scholarly books and 83 scholarly journals were referenced.

Whilst this was a small study, it does hint at a relationship between the two.  It would be useful to undertake a more extensive study and widen this out for more meaningful results.

She also wanted to look at any impact the College Library may have on dissertation marks.  The starting point, was to look at the print books used to see if any were borrowed from the library; with journal articles it was whether the article was in stock in print in the library or available to view online through our electronic resources.

Out of all the sources in quoted 43 dissertations, 150 print books were borrowed from the library and 107 were scholarly in nature – although if we looked at journal articles the picture was less promising.  Out of 151 articles that could be found via the library only 35 were scholarly.    So what does this tell us?  Two things… that our students are finding and using a lot of lot of non-scholarly material though the library and that they are finding open access material to support their research.

What else can we take from this? Are our students using the library electronic resources effectively, do they know how to evaluate the quality of source, and in some cases are they using google and finding scholarly articles that have paywalls and viewing the abstract rather than the whole article?

Another interesting fact is that our requests for Inter-library Loans from the British Library had reduced drastically over the last 5 years.  There will be many books and journal articles that could be available and very relevant to students doing their research.  Why do students not want to request Inter Library loans anymore?  This is a question that we should be asking both ourselves and students; and if students will rely more and more on Open Access research, how to they easily find it?

The findings from this study have been forwarded to the relevant academic staff within Arts for further discussion.  One thing we have learned is that the library has an important role to play in helping students find the right scholarly sources. We want to give students the best chance of success whether it is research for dissertations or essays.

 

ESOL Reading Week at Bradford College

It’s ESOL Reading Week at Bradford College! The Library has organised a set of quizzes and a display to inspire and enthuse our ESOL readers taking part.

Julie, librarian for ESOL in Bradford College, says “the Library hopes you will have a great week. Read, read, read!”

Have a go at:

  • Library quiz – quiz sheets for Pre-entry/beginner, Entry 1 and Entry 2
  • Write a review of a story you have read
  • Write a story or poem

PRIZES TO BE WON!

Call in to see us at the Library Information Desk for; quiz sheets, to hand in completed quiz sheets and to get suggestions for books to read.

Remember: “Books can be dangerous. The best ones should be labelled ‘This could change your life’.” ― Helen Exley

To Renew or Auto-Renew… our Librarians give a paper at the Koha User Group, November 2018

To Renew or Auto-Renew… our Librarians give a paper at the Koha User Group, November 2018

In 2016/2017, the Library undertook a major review of our Library Management System with the result that we moved all our data and systems over to an open source LMS called Koha. The review gave us the opportunity to look at our existing practices and procedures and, following extensive discussion, consultation and research, we introduced auto-renewals in September 2018.  In November 2018, two of the Librarians responsible for managing Koha, Simon Lyes and Haydn Clark, gave a short presentation of our experiences at the Koha User Group.

The talk looked at 3 main areas:  Why auto-renewals, Obstacles, and What we learnt.

Simon and Haydn explained the reasons why we decided to introduce auto-renewals.  In their talk they identified the key reasons as simplification, fairness, efficiency, peer pressure and popularity.  As with many academic libraries, we had a complex system of loans and renewals aiming to satisfy different student needs.  One title may have some copies for long loan, others on week loan, reference only or short loan (3 hours).  Each loan had different levels of fines attached, and different renewal rules.  Students would have to remember to renew their books or risk a fine, even when the books weren’t required by other library users. Auto-renewals meant that we were able to simplify all our loans (other than the Teacher Training Collection) to just 2 weeks each, with just one fine system. Students who borrowed books that weren’t required by other students would be able to keep them for up to 6 months. We expected a reduction in staff time used in labeling books, explaining different loan types, and reminding students to renew. And we hoped for a reduction in fines as only students who didn’t return books in demand would be penalised.

There were some obstacles that we resolved through compromise and a great deal of promotion.  Some colleagues felt auto-renewals would be difficult to explain to some students, particularly those with English as a second language.  We were also  concerned that it might be easier to forget about loans without the regular need to renew. Auto-renewals do depend on borrowers checking their college email, so we heavily promoted student email information in our inductions, at the library counter and to teaching staff.  We also hoped that with the introduction of Office 365 for students and staff, use of college email would become standard.  There was a concern that books may be kept out longer, leaving fewer copies on the shelves to browse.  Again, the solution was to educate students on using the library catalogue for discovery and reservations.  In terms of staff workload, there was the major job of removing loan stickers from thousands of books that had the week loan status.  Simon and Haydn also also talked about the technical problems in switching item types for over 70,000 items from 3- and 1-week to the 2-week loan type, and how PTFS had helped by running the switch for us.  We had to return and reissue everything that was on loan so that these would auto-renew going forward We also made sure that we consulted with students and staff, through the policy approval process, in student course committees, and by liaising with the student union.

We learnt a number of lessons that we were happy to pass on.  Firstly, anyone thinking of introducing this service must be sure that they are on the right version of Koha.  This is because there was a bug on the version of Koha that we were on, that caused significant problems with calculation of fines for items where auto-renewal was not possible. This bug was eliminated in the subsequent version of Koha.  Our second piece of advice was to Read the manual.  We had problems with the set-up of how the email notices worked, and what information could be sent for each email.  There was some confusion with the first emails as they didn’t contain the expected information.  Finally, Consult other Koha users.  Simon and Haydn used this as an opportunity to thank other teams in the room that had given us input from their experience of auto renewals.

Our conclusion was that overall the service has so far been successful.  Fewer fines were being collected from students, and feedback has been positive. We like the simpler loan system, and we are seeing students take control of their library records and check their emails.  We have reached our 6-month mark and have not seen any problems in recovering books. As for the talk, Simon and Haydn enjoyed their day.  The talk was received well, with a surprising number of questions asked, given that they were the last presentation of the day and people had trains to catch!

 

 

 

 

 

 

IBISWorld gives students an edge in job interviews

You may have already used IBIS World to find industry information such as trends, forecasts and statistics – but did you know that it might also help you in preparing for an interview?

Companies always like to see applicants who have done their research, and we think that IBIS World gives a really good overview of the most important issues facing your industry today.

Find out key trends (useful for interview questions), the biggest companies, operating conditions (good for ideas on the challenges faced by the industry) and different types of roles available in the industry (to help with career planning).  Each report includes the value of the industry in the UK and the number of employees. You can see if there are lots of smaller businesses, or whether the industry is dominated by a few key players.  There are also a full set of Brexit Impact Statements – just in case that question comes up too!

So if you’re thinking about working in the Arts, Construction, Beauty, Catering or Finance, these short reports will make sure you have a comprehensive overview of your industry.

Click here for IBIS World’s own guide on IBISWorld for job interviews

For more information, come and visit us at the Library Information Desk on floor 2 of the David Hockney Building, or email us at  [email protected] 

Write a review on the Library Catalogue for #LoveToRead month

 

Everyone has an opinion.  We all talk about TV programmes we’ve watched, films we’ve been to see, our favourite shops or the best place we visited on our holidays.  Everyone likes good advice.  We will ask someone who has already been there or read it or watched it for their opinion – and then follow (or ignore) what they said!

Crime Fiction fans may look on Amazon reviews to see what other people thought about the latest James Pattison book.  Restaurant reviews appear in every newspaper or city guide, and Film review programmes are on the radio and TV.  Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets now has 8,000 reviews on Amazon!  A lot of people are writing reviews and a lot of people are reading them.

You can now write reviews of your library books.  So why would you want to write a review?   Perhaps you want to tell other students about the textbook you borrowed – did it explain things properly or was it difficult to understand?  What is the best book on your lecturers reading list – what was helpful in your exam? You may have really enjoyed reading a book from the Hockney Library Reading Collection and want other people to know.  Share your thoughts with the rest of college. It’s easy – just follow the instructions below and write away!

How to create a review in Koha

Step 1: Open the Library Catalogue http://librarycatalogue.bradfordcollege.ac.uk and click on the Log in to your account link at the top right of the page.

Step 2: Find the book that you want to review by typing in the title or keywords in the search box.

Step 3: You will see a list of results.  Click on the Title to get the full record of the book

Step 4: Scroll to the bottom of the book record and click on the Comments tab

You will see a link to Post your comments on this item. Click on the link and enter your text. Click on Submit and close this window.

Your comments will appear once they have been approved by a moderator.

Contact the library if you can’t log in –  [email protected] or 01274 433112.  We look forward to seeing what you write!

Trial of Statista

We are currently trialling a database called Statista.  This trial will run to mid-February and we welcome any feedback on it from students and staff. The trial will only work on campus so please log on using the college wifi.

Use Statista to access a wide variety of UK, US and international statistics.  Data can be downloaded as a PDF, Powerpoint presentation or Excel spreadsheet which can then be manipulated.

To search Statista, go to statista.com.  You will see the home page with a simple search screen, and options in the blue bar along the top.

Enter your search terms into the search box to find results across industry and report types.

You can then narrow by publication date, industry or country, and also select report type such as Statistics, Forecasts, or Additional Studies.  You can also select Topics to view an initial overview of all content on a certain topic including statistics, infographics and studies. This might be a useful starting point for students researching a subject.

Data comes from a range of sources including journals, trade reports and other statistical publications. You can also access studies and reports. The site is straightforward to use and suitable for FE and HE levels. For more information on Statista, read our blog and contact us with any questions. The trial lasts for a month and we’d be really interested in any feedback you have.

Contact us on [email protected] for any feedback or if you have problems or questions relating to the trial.

United Reads

Some great fiction and biographies of people’s actual experiences can really get you to empathise with people of different backgrounds, ethnic groups etc and  challenge your viewpoints about; freedom, equality, respect for the law and all the ‘united values’.

This is a mixed booklist of easy and more difficult reads and fiction and non-fiction but they all will pose questions and make you think about the different values, for example what is freedom?   Is one person’s respect for law another person’s subjugation?  This is just a taster but hopefully an introduction to the output of many authors who explore different values and how people react.

United Values Book List

Equality

I am Malala

The girl who stood up for education and was shot by the Taliban, nevertheless she pursued her education and has become a campaigner for the education of girls.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

 

Orwell, George.  Animal farm.

Having got rid of their human masters, the animals of Manor Farm look forward to a life of freedom and plenty. But gradually a cunning, ruthless élite emerges and the other animals discover that they are not as equal as they thought.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

Ellis, Deborah.  Parvana’s journey.

Parvana is denied an education in Taliban controlled Afghanistan.  This is her journey to freedom and education.

Shelved 813.54/ELL

 

 

 

Respect of Law

Horton, Lesley.  Twisted tracks.

A detective mystery story set in Bradford dealing with murder and many of the social ills of the time.  The author worked with West Yorkshire police and had concerns about how young women were treated.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

Mutual Respect

Delaney, Shelagh.  A taste of honey.

‘A Taste of Honey’ is a play about the adolescent Jo and her relationships with those about her – her irresponsible, roving mother Helen and her mum’s newly acquired drunken husband, the black sailor who leaves her pregnant and Geoffrey the homosexual art student who moves in to help with the baby.

Shelved at 822.914/DEL

 

 

Fairfield, Lesley.  Tyranny.

One day, horrified by her reflection in the mirror, Anna makes a life-changing decision – that food is the enemy. Her obsession with being thin and beautiful will now dominate her every waking and sleeping hour.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

Individual Liberty

Levy, Andrea.  The long song.

Set in Jamaica during the last turbulent years of slavery and the early years of freedom that followed, this novel follows the life of July, a slave girl, who lives upon a sugar plantation named Amity.

Originally published: 2010.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

Warman, Janice.  The world beneath.

1970s South Africa. Eleven-year-old Joshua lives with his mother, who works as a maid for the Malherbes in a white middle-class area in Cape Town. We see this enclosed world through Joshua’s eyes as we share his longing for his family and his past life in the rural Ciskei. When a boy enters the garden one night, Joshua offers him refuge. The stranger turns out to be a freedom fighter on the run. As riots sweep the country Joshua becomes more and more aware of the political situation around him and is determined to help bring about change for himself, his family and ultimately his country.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

Lorca, Frederico Garcia.  The house of Bernarda Alba and other plays.

The revolutionary genius of Spanish theatre, Lorca brought vivid and tragic-poetry to the stage with these powerful dramas. All appeal for freedom and sexual and social equality, and are also passionate defences of the imagination.

Translated from the Spanish.

Shelved at 862.62/GAR

 

Tolerance

Long, Hayley.  Sophie someone.

Sophie Nieuwenleven is sort of English and sort of Belgian. She and her family came to live in Belgium when she was only four or five years old, but she’s fourteen now and has never been quite sure why they left England in the first place. Then, one day, Sophie makes a startling discovery. Finally Sophie can unlock the mystery of who she really is. This is a story about identity and confusion – and feeling so utterly freaked out that you just can’t put it into words. But it’s also about hope. And the belief that, somehow, everything will work out OK.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

Have you got any suggestions that we could add to our list?  Contact us on [email protected] and let us know what you think!