IBISWorld gives students an edge in job interviews

You may have already used IBIS World to find industry information such as trends, forecasts and statistics – but did you know that it might also help you in preparing for an interview?

Companies always like to see applicants who have done their research, and we think that IBIS World gives a really good overview of the most important issues facing your industry today.

Find out key trends (useful for interview questions), the biggest companies, operating conditions (good for ideas on the challenges faced by the industry) and different types of roles available in the industry (to help with career planning).  Each report includes the value of the industry in the UK and the number of employees. You can see if there are lots of smaller businesses, or whether the industry is dominated by a few key players.  There are also a full set of Brexit Impact Statements – just in case that question comes up too!

So if you’re thinking about working in the Arts, Construction, Beauty, Catering or Finance, these short reports will make sure you have a comprehensive overview of your industry.

Click here for IBIS World’s own guide on IBISWorld for job interviews

For more information, come and visit us at the Library Information Desk on floor 2 of the David Hockney Building, or email us at  [email protected] 

Write a review on the Library Catalogue for #LoveToRead month

 

Everyone has an opinion.  We all talk about TV programmes we’ve watched, films we’ve been to see, our favourite shops or the best place we visited on our holidays.  Everyone likes good advice.  We will ask someone who has already been there or read it or watched it for their opinion – and then follow (or ignore) what they said!

Crime Fiction fans may look on Amazon reviews to see what other people thought about the latest James Pattison book.  Restaurant reviews appear in every newspaper or city guide, and Film review programmes are on the radio and TV.  Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets now has 8,000 reviews on Amazon!  A lot of people are writing reviews and a lot of people are reading them.

You can now write reviews of your library books.  So why would you want to write a review?   Perhaps you want to tell other students about the textbook you borrowed – did it explain things properly or was it difficult to understand?  What is the best book on your lecturers reading list – what was helpful in your exam? You may have really enjoyed reading a book from the Hockney Library Reading Collection and want other people to know.  Share your thoughts with the rest of college. It’s easy – just follow the instructions below and write away!

How to create a review in Koha

Step 1: Open the Library Catalogue http://librarycatalogue.bradfordcollege.ac.uk and click on the Log in to your account link at the top right of the page.

Step 2: Find the book that you want to review by typing in the title or keywords in the search box.

Step 3: You will see a list of results.  Click on the Title to get the full record of the book

Step 4: Scroll to the bottom of the book record and click on the Comments tab

You will see a link to Post your comments on this item. Click on the link and enter your text. Click on Submit and close this window.

Your comments will appear once they have been approved by a moderator.

Contact the library if you can’t log in –  [email protected] or 01274 433112.  We look forward to seeing what you write!

Trial of Statista

We are currently trialling a database called Statista.  This trial will run to mid-February and we welcome any feedback on it from students and staff. The trial will only work on campus so please log on using the college wifi.

Use Statista to access a wide variety of UK, US and international statistics.  Data can be downloaded as a PDF, Powerpoint presentation or Excel spreadsheet which can then be manipulated.

To search Statista, go to statista.com.  You will see the home page with a simple search screen, and options in the blue bar along the top.

Enter your search terms into the search box to find results across industry and report types.

You can then narrow by publication date, industry or country, and also select report type such as Statistics, Forecasts, or Additional Studies.  You can also select Topics to view an initial overview of all content on a certain topic including statistics, infographics and studies. This might be a useful starting point for students researching a subject.

Data comes from a range of sources including journals, trade reports and other statistical publications. You can also access studies and reports. The site is straightforward to use and suitable for FE and HE levels. For more information on Statista, read our blog and contact us with any questions. The trial lasts for a month and we’d be really interested in any feedback you have.

Contact us on [email protected] for any feedback or if you have problems or questions relating to the trial.

United Reads

Some great fiction and biographies of people’s actual experiences can really get you to empathise with people of different backgrounds, ethnic groups etc and  challenge your viewpoints about; freedom, equality, respect for the law and all the ‘united values’.

This is a mixed booklist of easy and more difficult reads and fiction and non-fiction but they all will pose questions and make you think about the different values, for example what is freedom?   Is one person’s respect for law another person’s subjugation?  This is just a taster but hopefully an introduction to the output of many authors who explore different values and how people react.

United Values Book List

Equality

I am Malala

The girl who stood up for education and was shot by the Taliban, nevertheless she pursued her education and has become a campaigner for the education of girls.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

 

Orwell, George.  Animal farm.

Having got rid of their human masters, the animals of Manor Farm look forward to a life of freedom and plenty. But gradually a cunning, ruthless élite emerges and the other animals discover that they are not as equal as they thought.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

Ellis, Deborah.  Parvana’s journey.

Parvana is denied an education in Taliban controlled Afghanistan.  This is her journey to freedom and education.

Shelved 813.54/ELL

 

 

 

Respect of Law

Horton, Lesley.  Twisted tracks.

A detective mystery story set in Bradford dealing with murder and many of the social ills of the time.  The author worked with West Yorkshire police and had concerns about how young women were treated.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

Mutual Respect

Delaney, Shelagh.  A taste of honey.

‘A Taste of Honey’ is a play about the adolescent Jo and her relationships with those about her – her irresponsible, roving mother Helen and her mum’s newly acquired drunken husband, the black sailor who leaves her pregnant and Geoffrey the homosexual art student who moves in to help with the baby.

Shelved at 822.914/DEL

 

 

Fairfield, Lesley.  Tyranny.

One day, horrified by her reflection in the mirror, Anna makes a life-changing decision – that food is the enemy. Her obsession with being thin and beautiful will now dominate her every waking and sleeping hour.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

Individual Liberty

Levy, Andrea.  The long song.

Set in Jamaica during the last turbulent years of slavery and the early years of freedom that followed, this novel follows the life of July, a slave girl, who lives upon a sugar plantation named Amity.

Originally published: 2010.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

Warman, Janice.  The world beneath.

1970s South Africa. Eleven-year-old Joshua lives with his mother, who works as a maid for the Malherbes in a white middle-class area in Cape Town. We see this enclosed world through Joshua’s eyes as we share his longing for his family and his past life in the rural Ciskei. When a boy enters the garden one night, Joshua offers him refuge. The stranger turns out to be a freedom fighter on the run. As riots sweep the country Joshua becomes more and more aware of the political situation around him and is determined to help bring about change for himself, his family and ultimately his country.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

Lorca, Frederico Garcia.  The house of Bernarda Alba and other plays.

The revolutionary genius of Spanish theatre, Lorca brought vivid and tragic-poetry to the stage with these powerful dramas. All appeal for freedom and sexual and social equality, and are also passionate defences of the imagination.

Translated from the Spanish.

Shelved at 862.62/GAR

 

Tolerance

Long, Hayley.  Sophie someone.

Sophie Nieuwenleven is sort of English and sort of Belgian. She and her family came to live in Belgium when she was only four or five years old, but she’s fourteen now and has never been quite sure why they left England in the first place. Then, one day, Sophie makes a startling discovery. Finally Sophie can unlock the mystery of who she really is. This is a story about identity and confusion – and feeling so utterly freaked out that you just can’t put it into words. But it’s also about hope. And the belief that, somehow, everything will work out OK.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

Have you got any suggestions that we could add to our list?  Contact us on [email protected] and let us know what you think!

Library Resource of the month – Journals

This month we want to highlight the fantastic print journals at your physical fingertips.

Do people still read print magazines?  Journal publishers are reporting that print is restrictive in terms of accessibility and content length. Academic articles are increasingly online, due to rising print costs and drops in demand for print subscriptions (see this THES article on the future of journal publishing in the ‘digital age’: As PNAS calls time on print, will more journals follow suit?, January 8th 2019).

It is certainly true that in our institution, students are heading online using our Discovery service or subject-specific databases to find high quality academic content for their research.  We have moved significantly in that direction too – 10 years ago we had over 400 print subscriptions, now we have 150 print titles and over 40 individual online subscriptions; but alongside these we subscribe to various journal rich electronic databases which give access to over 60,000 titles.

However there are good reasons to maintain print journals depending on their audience, content and cost.

Do you browse the contents of an online journal, or go directly to the article you want? Most of us tend to target our search, missing out on that chance discovery of an unexpectedly interesting article tucked away on page 5.  A scan read of trade journals such as Law Society Gazette or Police Professional gives a quick overview of developments in the field.  And spending a few minutes in the library flicking through the latest edition can be a nice break from the desk.

Our journals are displayed with the latest edition facing out into the library.  An interesting front cover can often catch your eye – even if it’s not in your usual area of interest.  For example, the latest edition of Fit Pro in the library has features on Yin Yoga, Snow Activities and the fitness of performers in musical theatre!  Art, law or education titles might not be your usual read but all may have topics of interest from time to time.

Sometimes we don’t have a choice:  decisions from publishers still impact on which format the library subscribes to.  Contrary to opinion, not all journals are published online; some publishers are quite restrictive with their electronic access and cost to academic institutions, and accompanying images may not always appear clearly.   The latter is extremely important when viewing Arts and Creative titles so we continue to subscribe to many art & design titles including Elle Decoration and Art Monthly.

Then there is the feel of the print journal – studies show that some of us recall information better when it has been read in print rather than online, partly due to the interactive nature of print reading.  There is something about turning the page that aids memory.   In fact, many online platforms are trying to replicate the look and feel of turning the page.  You might also be aware of the various studies on screen fatigue which can impact on a reader’s comprehension and learning.

However, as we become increasingly used to reading online, and the technology improves to encourage more interactivity while reading, this may not be the case in the future (see “Screen vs. paper: what is the difference for reading and learning?” https://insights.uksg.org/articles/10.1629/uksg.236/). How we interact with online reading depends on our own preferences, experiences, and the technology.  So we in the library are always aware of the need to be flexible in ordering and maintaining journals collections.

Either way, we think that our 150 journals are worth keeping.. and we hope that you do too. So come along and discover something new in the library today!     

Access to Bradford College online library resources directly from Google Scholar

Did you know that you can now access articles directly from a Google Scholar search if we have a Bradford College subscription to them?

If you haven’t used it before, Google Scholar is a search engine that covers scholarly literature, including articles, theses, abstracts and reports from a wide range of disciplines and types of information.  It is a great way to find free material such as open source articles and reports by organisations which may not be indexed by our subscription databases. However, Google Scholar also includes links to journal articles that are behind a database paywall – in which case you can only view the citation details and abstract.

The good news is that you can now connect Google Scholar to Bradford College Library’s journals collection so that when you have access to an article, you will see a PDF or a Full-Text link appear in your results. It just takes 4 easy steps:

  1. Go to Google Scholar , click on the 3 bar icon at the top left of the page, and click on Settings. 

2. Click Library Links and search for Bradford College. You may see two options – just click on the option Bradford College – Full Text Available

 

3. Click on Save. Now when you run a search you will see a link to Full Text Available – this will take you to the Library resource.  If you are off campus you will have to sign in.

4. If you see a screen like the one below saying “If the page does not display”, click on open the page in a new window. This sometimes happens if the article is from a third party database (eg Emerald) or if EBSCO needs a prompt to display properly!

 

caution icon If you have any problems accessing our resources in this way, please let us know.  We may need to tweak our settings!

Remember – not all the content on Google Scholar will be available through the Library or free online.  If you find something on Google Scholar that you can’t access, get in touch with us and we may be able to help.

Library Resource of the Month – Library Help Guides

This month we have been promoting December’s Resource of the Month – our new Library Help Guides.  These are also known as Libguides and are widely used by librarians across the UK and worldwide to curate library collections and share information to support teaching and learning.

The guides showcase the library resources, and are intended to be an easily accessible portal for students to find library resources easily and quickly.  They help guide library users through a sometimes bewildering range of resources.  We have embedded video help, guides and worksheets to help students select the best resource for their task.  We provide direct links to our catalogue so students can view real-time availability of books on the shelf, or directly access our E-Books.

Our expert Libguide librarians have created a template so information on different subjects is presented in a standard format, making it easier for students to switch between subjects.  Each subject page has a Getting Started tab with useful links and library news.  Students can then click on the tabs to find subject specific information like key books and e-books with links to the catalogue, course reading lists, links to key databases and guides on how to use them, help on using journals in their research, finding articles and evaluating the results, and study skills resources.

We’re interested in any feedback, and collaborations with students and teaching staff.  Please get in touch with any comments!

[email protected]

Using Britannica to research World War One

For our November #ResourceOfTheMonth we are promoting Britannica Academic. This is a brilliant resource for all levels of study but particularly good for students who want to find a concise, comprehensive account of a topic they are unfamiliar with.  Britannica covers subjects from history to science to current affairs and includes images and video to really bring the subject alive.

Bradford College Librarian Julia Sherrington has been involved in setting up the promotion and is the author of the quiz that you can now collect from the Library Information desk.

She says:

Allied and German officials at the signing of the armistice that ended the fighting in World War I, November 11, 1918. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

“We wanted to get involved with commemorating 100th anniversary of the end of WWI;  which of course is extra special this year.  It has been talked about a lot in the media and hopefully it is a topic students will be curious about.   We came up with a quiz which involved using Britannica Academic to get students researching a topic , finding something out for themselves and using a library resource.

Britannica Academic is a very broad resource covering lots of subject areas.  It is a good start to finding both basic and more detailed information on a topic. As well as giving access to  credible articles , it also has a dictionary function, and  lists relevant websites and primary sources.  It will also link to Britannica Image Quest to search images.  We feel it is a great resource and hope that once a student uses it they will see its potential for researching other topics.”

We have freebies to give out at the Library Information Desk when a student completes the quiz.

All correct entries will be entered into a draw to win a £10 voucher.

Library Resource of the Month – Britannica

Library Resource of the Month is back after an extended summer break (!), and for November we’d like to introduce you to Britannica Academic.

You have probably heard of the Encyclopedia Britannica. First published in 1768 in Edinburgh when it was just 3 volumes, it was last published in print in 2010 and had expanded to a mega 32 volume set – though now it is only available online.

Britannica Academic can be accessed via mobile, tablets, online and whiteboards in classrooms. It is a multimedia encyclopedia which means each article includes images, video, interactive maps and charts, and quizzes plus the option to create your own personal folder to save your research.

As we approach the centenary of the end of World War One, see what you can find out about the war on Britannica Academic. Or brush up your Shakespeare knowledge before the RSC bring ‘A Comedy of Errors’ to Bradford College on December 3rd.

Ask at the Library Information Desk for a demo or help in accessing and using Britannica.  And look out for our prize-winning quiz next week!

 

Keeping track of your research

I’ve seen a lot of students recently, requesting support with their dissertation research.  One thing I’ve noticed is that most students are not using Reference Management software such as Menderley or Zotero.  Even at a more basic level, they are not using the tools available in our subscription databases such as EBSCO EDS or Westlaw which allow them to save articles, output references and set up alerts.  This could be down to a gap in our promotion or a lack of curiosity on their part perhaps.   I thought I’d write a post for our students on how to make use of these tools, demonstrating how easy they are to set up, and how useful they will be as they build up their research.

Keeping track…

A number of databases offer additional features to support you when you are carrying out research.  In my area of Law and Business, personalised logins are available for Business Source, Westlaw, LexisLibrary, and Emerald.  However, the database you are probably most familiar with is Discover, our single search platform from EBSCO.

When you search Discover, you will notice a small blue folder icon appearing next to each result.  Clicking on this icon allows you to save your results into a personalised account which you can access any time you log into any EBSCO database.   Once you set this up you can also save and re-run searches, and set up search and journal alerts so you can keep researching even when you’re not logged in.  See our next post for help with this.

Step 1: Set up your profile

So your first step is to create your profile.  This is different from your library account.

Go to [email protected] which is available from the Library Webpages, the Online Library tab in Moodle, and as a link from the Library catalogue.  Click on the Sign in to Save Results link at the top of the page.

The first time you do this, you will see a message ‘There are no results in your folder’.  There’s a second link you have to click on saying Sign in to My EBSCOhost.   From here you will see a log-in form and the option to ‘Create a new Account’.  Fill in your details and choose a strong password.

Step 2: Save the good stuff

Click on the Back button to start searching.  Remember you can limit your search by Date of Publication, by Source (Academic Journals, Magazines, Trade Publications, Books), and by Subject, Language, and more.  Then, to save records to view at a later date, click on the Add to Folder image next to each record.  This may be a record for a book, journal article or e-book.  Save as many records as you would like by clicking on the folder icon.

Step 3: Organise your results

View your folder by either clicking on Sign in to Save Results at the top of the screen, or on Folder View in the top right of the screen.  You should see a list of all the records that you have saved with links to full-text where available.

You can create as many folders as you need. This is good if you want to group articles by assignment title or module.  You can even create sub-folders if you like a good hierachy.  Click on the New link to create a folder and decide where you want to locate it.  Then move your results to the new folder by clicking in the box beside the title of the result, and clicking on the Move To drop down list.  Once you have organised your folders, click on the back button to continue searching.  You can now save results directly into folders.

Why we love this

We love this feature of Discover because it helps you stay organised.  If you come across something for another topic, you can just save it and put it out of your mind until you need it.  These tools work on the mobile site too, if you like to research on the go… It’s easy to create new folders and delete old results, and it saves you a ton of money in printing. Contact us for more information.