United Reads

Some great fiction and biographies of people’s actual experiences can really get you to empathise with people of different backgrounds, ethnic groups etc and  challenge your viewpoints about; freedom, equality, respect for the law and all the ‘united values’.

This is a mixed booklist of easy and more difficult reads and fiction and non-fiction but they all will pose questions and make you think about the different values, for example what is freedom?   Is one person’s respect for law another person’s subjugation?  This is just a taster but hopefully an introduction to the output of many authors who explore different values and how people react.

United Values Book List

Equality

I am Malala

The girl who stood up for education and was shot by the Taliban, nevertheless she pursued her education and has become a campaigner for the education of girls.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

 

Orwell, George.  Animal farm.

Having got rid of their human masters, the animals of Manor Farm look forward to a life of freedom and plenty. But gradually a cunning, ruthless élite emerges and the other animals discover that they are not as equal as they thought.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

Ellis, Deborah.  Parvana’s journey.

Parvana is denied an education in Taliban controlled Afghanistan.  This is her journey to freedom and education.

Shelved 813.54/ELL

 

 

 

Respect of Law

Horton, Lesley.  Twisted tracks.

A detective mystery story set in Bradford dealing with murder and many of the social ills of the time.  The author worked with West Yorkshire police and had concerns about how young women were treated.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

Mutual Respect

Delaney, Shelagh.  A taste of honey.

‘A Taste of Honey’ is a play about the adolescent Jo and her relationships with those about her – her irresponsible, roving mother Helen and her mum’s newly acquired drunken husband, the black sailor who leaves her pregnant and Geoffrey the homosexual art student who moves in to help with the baby.

Shelved at 822.914/DEL

 

 

Fairfield, Lesley.  Tyranny.

One day, horrified by her reflection in the mirror, Anna makes a life-changing decision – that food is the enemy. Her obsession with being thin and beautiful will now dominate her every waking and sleeping hour.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

 

Individual Liberty

Levy, Andrea.  The long song.

Set in Jamaica during the last turbulent years of slavery and the early years of freedom that followed, this novel follows the life of July, a slave girl, who lives upon a sugar plantation named Amity.

Originally published: 2010.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

Warman, Janice.  The world beneath.

1970s South Africa. Eleven-year-old Joshua lives with his mother, who works as a maid for the Malherbes in a white middle-class area in Cape Town. We see this enclosed world through Joshua’s eyes as we share his longing for his family and his past life in the rural Ciskei. When a boy enters the garden one night, Joshua offers him refuge. The stranger turns out to be a freedom fighter on the run. As riots sweep the country Joshua becomes more and more aware of the political situation around him and is determined to help bring about change for himself, his family and ultimately his country.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

Lorca, Frederico Garcia.  The house of Bernarda Alba and other plays.

The revolutionary genius of Spanish theatre, Lorca brought vivid and tragic-poetry to the stage with these powerful dramas. All appeal for freedom and sexual and social equality, and are also passionate defences of the imagination.

Translated from the Spanish.

Shelved at 862.62/GAR

 

Tolerance

Long, Hayley.  Sophie someone.

Sophie Nieuwenleven is sort of English and sort of Belgian. She and her family came to live in Belgium when she was only four or five years old, but she’s fourteen now and has never been quite sure why they left England in the first place. Then, one day, Sophie makes a startling discovery. Finally Sophie can unlock the mystery of who she really is. This is a story about identity and confusion – and feeling so utterly freaked out that you just can’t put it into words. But it’s also about hope. And the belief that, somehow, everything will work out OK.

Shelved in the Reading Collection

 

Have you got any suggestions that we could add to our list?  Contact us on [email protected] and let us know what you think!